Long Island Couple Looks to Trademark “Occupy Wall Street”

October 25, 2011, by Mandour & Associates, APC

Los Angeles – Long Island couple Robert and Diane Maresca have filed a trademark application with the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) for the name “Occupy Wall Street.” The “Occupy” organization is responsible for the protests that have taken up Wall Street in New York City and other cities across the United States.

Occupy Wall Street is a revolutionary-type movement that began on September 17, 2011 in Liberty Square in Lower Manhattan’s Financial District and has spread to hundreds of cities both nationwide and globally. The movement has adopted a “power to the people” philosophy, fighting against the power of major banks and multinational corporations and Wall Street’s role of creating an economic collapse that has caused a global recession.

In their application with the USPTO, the Marescas are seeking to trademark the phrase so they can stamp it on a variety of products including t-shirts, bumper stickers, beach bags, footwear, umbrellas, and hobo bags. When the couple was asked whether they were being hypocritical by attempting to cash in on a movement that protests corporations and capitalism, they responded that they have a “practical business side” and added, “If I didn’t buy it and use it someone else will.”

The Marescas reportedly spent $975.00 on the October 18th trademark filing. According to the couple, when they initially did a trademark check on the USPTO database, they discovered that a Brooklyn resident had filed for the trademark for the phrase “We are the 99%.” The Marescas proceeded with their filing for “Occupy Wall Street,” believing it would be a more powerful brand.

Robert Maresca stated that he has visited the Occupy Wall Street protest site several times and is in agreement with the movement that major corporations have too much power and influence over our elected officials. The couple has yet to mass produce any goods with the “Occupy Wall Street” phrase but they have already inked some t-shirt designs and have sewed some clothing and bags in their Long Island home.

The Marescas describe themselves as being “relatively conservative” and are pro-union and politically independent. Robert Maresca, a former union iron-worker, said that his family has been greatly affected by the recession which followed him becoming disabled by a stroke and seizure.